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I need a conference! v1.3

Latest update: Here's another conference just announced .

Update: Found a nifty list of conferences on the contentwrangler's blog. Will have to go through them properly later.

Now A has a functional requirement for all her master students: You have to publish something, or speak at a conference. I have been looking at various conferences, but unfortunately many of them are either too commercial/product oriented (like this one or this one), or they are not closely enough related to WCM (like this one and this one ). Perhaps I'm being too picky about it, and I'm quickly running out of time.

Any conference I apply for will have to be:
  • Not too expensive (the institute will probably not cover more than about 800€ plus travelling expenses to a certain limit)
  • Related to content management or web
  • Theoretically/academically focused (i.e. students and scholars attend)
  • Taking place within the next 6 months (very hard to submit a paper and be accepted in such a short timeline)

So if you have any ideas, please let me know.

The Gilbane Conference

San Francisco, April 24 - 26, 2006 (next one in November, submit by May)

No specific deadline for submittals, I doubt I'll get to speak at this one. Too industrial, high class.

LinuxTag
Wiesbaden, May 3-6, 2006
Also very industrial (but has a track on Information Web). Vendors presenting, buyers visiting. Deadline was a couple o' days ago.

The International Conference on e-Learning
Montreal, June 22-23, 2006
Very academic. Part of the ACI (I got an abstract accepted for an earlier KM conference, but did not submit the paper). Is about e-Learning, but CM is mentioned as a topic. Submission deadline was 12th of January.

The IASTED International Conference
Calgary, June 17-19, 2006
A wide range of topics. Academic. Ugly website, but this might be something. Deadline is 1st of March.
Fee is about 500€ I guess, strange payment model. Flight will probably be 8.000 NOK.

International Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice

Monte Carlo Resort, Las Vegas, June 26-29, 2006
A suggest this, but content management is not really inside the scope of this conference, I think. Seems to be running in parallell with -

International Conference on Information and Knowledge Engineering

Now this is more like it! Exactly within my scope. Submissions by 20th of February (5-8 pages).

There is no information about the fee. Flight will cost from 6.000 NOK (BA) to 10.000 NOK (KLM). No rooms available in the conference hotel. We're lookin at 30$ a night and up.


Open Source World Conference

This one is in Malaga, Spain. But it's in February, and the CFP deadline was in November.


The European Conference on Knowledge Management

Budapest, September 4-5, 2006
Another ACI conference. A bit outside my scope. Submission deadline by 14th of March.
Travelling expenses will probably be less than 4.000 NOK, accomodation pretty cheap too. Conference registration is 200€ (for students).


Software Engineering and Advanced Applications

Cavtat/Dubrovnik (Croatia), August 28-September 1, 2006

A bit outside my scope.


Search engines for travel:

http://kilroytravels.no/

http://restplass.no/

http://wideroe.no/

http://www.expedia.com/

http://www.orbville.no/



Comments

  1. Anonymous17/1/06 17:26

    hi,

    the linuxtag is the biggest community event in europe around free software and open source. there companys too, but the tradition is to give free projects the same space for free. and the conference-program is normally not industrial. just try the call for papers, even it is finished last weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Allright, can't do any harm I guess :)

    I'll give it a try and send an abstract tomorrow.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous30/1/06 06:26

    Nice blog. Keep it up.
    As for the conference, you might want to have a look at "The 2nd International Content Management Forum Conference" (http://cmf2006.dk/)

    All the best with your thesis.

    /a
    http://apoorv.info

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks, Apoorv!

    I considered that conference last June, but for some reason I didn't apply (well, strictly speaking I had another submission going on). I don't think the thesis/my knowledge was mature enough at that point anyway.

    I'll ask my student guide/mentor (A) again. Hope she's willing to wait that long before I attend a conference. Denmark is definitely a preferable location geographically speaking.

    Oh, and I'm ashamed to say I didn't have time to apply for the LinuxTag conference. I need to write a proper abstract before applying anywhere, and the last weeks have been too hectic.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Anonymous9/2/06 14:31

    Hey, you wrote the link to our site orbville.no wrong, its not expedia ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ooops, sorry bout that. Will fix it the next time I publish this post. Kudos to your marketing dept for noticing! :D

    ReplyDelete
  7. Anonymous23/3/06 03:29

    Thomas:
    If you want to join us at Gilbane San Francisco send me an email at fgilbane@gmail.com. There are no speaking slots at the moment but you can still debate with others.
    Frank Gilbane

    ReplyDelete
  8. I would love to join the Gilbane conference! Unfortunately there are a great number of obstacles like lack of funding from the institute, not enough time to acquire an American visum, and the fact that I have to finish the thesis by 1st of May. This doesn't leave much possibility for traveling abroad in April. Thanks for the offer nonetheless!

    ReplyDelete

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