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More blog tuning

Now I had to do some more fixing on this blog.

Turns out the width of the column in the blog really didn't suit my content. I know people like reading narrow columns, but I like stuffing large images and tables into my posts, and given that my posts can be somewhat long, I think thin columns make single posts look too.. long.

So I started fiddling around with the template, and pretty soon managed to mess it up pretty bad. I ended up removing all background images, the blogspot-navbar, left-aligning the whole thing while making the header 100% wide, which is nice, but I still don't like the left-aligned content. So my CSS-knowledge is as crappy as ever, but hey, I'm a programmer, not a designer (which reminds me of another post I have to do soon: "The programming designer; a rare breed of which we are in dire need".

Now I'm adding some feedburner stuff. Took a wee while to find their JS snippets, they've got something called FeedFlare, which I can imagine is a JS snippet I can paste once, and then reconfigure from feedburner without having to mod my blogger template. Good idea. Check out the feeds somewhere to the right. Problem is adding the snippet in the bottom of each post, as this code is quite blackboxed in the new blogger templates.. Oh well, the normal feed thingie will do for now.

Took a little effort to remove all Blogger template's default feed stuff (I'm slowly replacing Blogger's template snippets with "manual" html).

Adding Google Analytics tag.. Worked fine.

Also fixed the ugly footer thingie.

Hard work this blogging stuff! Sort of like programming, web design and literature mixed into one sport :)

Comments

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hei Thomas, Her på NTNU er det alltid nye tanker på systemfronten, og jeg lurer på (siden du nå har en enorm oversikt :) om du kan anbefale noen åpne cms systemer?

    Mvh.
    Kristin

    ReplyDelete
  3. Med åpne så går jeg utifra du mener åpen kildekode systemer.

    Som jeg har skrivi en del ganger i bloggen her mange ganger så er det umulig å anbefale et enkelt produkt før man kjenner kravene i deres situasjon.

    Hvis jeg absolutt må si noen alternativ så har min personlige favoritt lenge vært Magnolia, og for dem som heller ønsker en lett PHP løsning så har jeg hørt mye bra om WordPress.

    Se også min tidligere post om dette her.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thomas
    Keep the good work.
    Great Blog.

    Brain Exercises

    ReplyDelete

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