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GitMinutes Taking on a Sponsor

I was a bit unsure whether I should put this post on the GitMinutes blog, but figured I'd rather not mess up the nice episode overview there. I'll share this link via the GitMinutes Twitter and Google+ feeds, and of course everyone listening will hear about it.

I am a bit worried that some people will not like that I'm going in a commercial direction with the podcast. Git is an open source project, and all my guests have participated on a volunteer basis. I've received hundreds of micro-donations via Gittip and Flattr, and probably some of the donors expected the show to keep going as an independent thing. If anyone feels hurt by this move, let me know and I'll reimburse your donations at least.

The main reason I'm doing this is that I want to create more GitMinutes content. Not only for the podcast, but maybe do screencasts and other stuff as well. I want to engage the community in a lot of new ways, and this will require resources that I don't want to pay out of my own pocket. Hopefully there will be some money left for me to keep as well, and this makes it easier for me to justify spending my free time on GitMinutes.

Now, I carefully picked a sponsor exactly so that it will not influence the show in any way. They do not produce any Git tooling, but still they are relevant to most listeners. I purposefully did not want to bore you talking about some irrelevant product. Rather than that, I want to tell you how much I'm enjoying their product myself, cause I have been doing so for a long time.

So head over to GitMinutes and listen to the freshly released episode 29, and you'll hear what the first sponsor is all about.

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