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Announcing GitMinutes - a Podcast for Git Users

I'm a bit late to my own party here, but I've launched a podcast called GitMinutes.


If you've been listening to my amateur/sandbox podcast tfnico's rants, you knew about this already, but now I finally got around to properly flaunt it on my own blog.

Why GitMinutes?

It's an obvious rip of Scott Hanselman's Hanselminutes, but hey, he nicked This Developer's Life from This American Life. I think GitMinutes has a great ring to it, it's easy to spell, and it had zero hits on Google before I started this.

But why a whole podcast about Git?

I'll admit it is a fairly narrow scope. But I was listening to a few technical podcast episodes lately that were about Git, and I wasn't really happy with the substance of it.

Also, I was recently approached about writing a Git book, but I figured that I could make something cooler than a book instead.

Also, there aren't enough technical podcasts for me to listen to, so I decided to add a little.

Also, there are a lot of Git users out there, and some don't really get to geek out about their Git usage enough. I hope this helps them.

What's in it for you?

I dunno, fame and fortune I guess. Actually, it's running at an estimated net minus of about 10$ monthly for all the traffic out of Amazon S3, so if you want to sponsor the show, I'm willing to negotiate something for you to cover that. I'd also love to buy a proper intro/outro song (although the free one from danosongs.com is great). I'd even love to be able to afford a 500$ audio mixer, but that's maybe a bit down the road.

If you want to know how I got rolling with podcasting, have a listen at tfnico's rants #002. If you want to learn more about how to listen to podcasts, listen to tfnico's rants #003.

How long will you keep it up?

I'll admit there might be a limit to interesting things we can discuss about Git, so after a bunch of episodes, I'll call it a day. Maybe start another podcast or something. Right now I've got 10 episodes lined up with some really interesting guests, so I'll see how it goes from there.

The first episode is out since Monday 25th, I've already recorded episode 2 & 3, and they will come out the following Mondays. Thanks for listening!

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