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A small Subversion guide for Git users

A recurring problem for us Git users is that we tend to forget the good old Subversion tricks. We want to do some patch on some old code in a Subversion repo, and suddenly we've got no idea how to work around.

Here's a quick guide:

> git pull
> svn update


> git add new_file
svn add new_file

> git add changed_file
N/A: SVN automatically adds all modifications to the index. If you don't want to commit it, don't change it.

> git commit; git push (you always have to do these together):
> svn commit

> git revert [SHA]
> svn merge -c -[R] .


> git branch branch_name
> svn copy url_to_project/trunk url_to_project/branches/branch_name


> git tag tag_name
> svn copy url_to_project/trunk url_to_project/tags/tag_name


> git checkout branch_name
> svn switch url_to_project/branches/branch_name/


> git merge branch 
svn merge -r[start]:[end] url_to_project/branches/branch_name .
(Note that you have to keep track of at which revision you made the branch, and that the result will always be squashed. Renames and moves will create conflicts).

> git rebase ...
Forget about it :)


Please add other neat SVN tricks to the comments if you can think of any good ones ;)

Comments

  1. What I was stuck with was:
    > git checkout .

    That's:
    > svn revert -R .

    Aslak

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've been trying to figure out what the equivalent to `git status` is for a particular branch. `svn status -u` shows status for *all* branches.

    ReplyDelete
  3. > svn info

    Will show you the current working copy path or branch you are on. Really useful.

    ReplyDelete

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