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The Blog that died and came back to life

A good month since my previous post. Apologies to those who've patiently been waiting for my weekly post. I've been busy sneaking agile into a project, running, cycling, doing two projects simultaneously, doing a Maven workshop (was going to write about that, but was too beat at the time), maintaining a wiki, writing an abstract for JavaZone, and having a real life at the same time.

In spite of having many things to do, things are going really great. The customer's project is really exciting, and I'm able to use some really modern, high quality frameworks, receiving experiences that I might be sharing at JavaZone this year.

Anyhow, this post announces a blog-ressurection. I'm getting back into the weekly cycle, at least till the summer, starting tomorrow. The red thread throughout the posts will be pointing towards my proposed JavaZone talk (atleast until it gets rejected :P ).

I'm gonna give an easy tease on what it's gonna be about: We've had Ruby on Railers bouncing around creating killer CRUD apps for some time now, and it is somewhat perplexing to me that us Java lads have not been able to come up with something equally easy, just for the heck of it. Well, point is that we have now. Modern frameworks (like Struts2) allow us to hammer in conventions (as in, before configuration) that can have a major simplifying impact on applications.

The above paragraph is one way of approaching the presentation, although I still haven't settled on the perspective I should take. Another more theoretical approach would be "A discussion of simplifying application development through the use of Action Domain Objects", but more on that tomorrow.

Comments

  1. Hi, Thomas

    Your JavaZone presentation sounds like it will be very interesting. Getting quickly up to speed on Java is something that is also near and dear to my heart.

    Looking forward to seeing your progress.

    ReplyDelete

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