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New Year's resolution: Blog more! (the boss says so)

As I wrote in my previous post I've been through my yearly evaluation at work. In short it was a 4-hour talk with my team-leader where we went through different aspects of my performance, such as development abilities, people skills, and so on.

Now such an evaluation might sound like a bit of a harsh Americanized performance indicator that decides my pay-check, but I appreciated getting honest feedback and ideas on areas where I can improve. Note that one important prerequisite for doing this sort of evaluation is having a team-leader you trust, not being the same person as the one who finally decides your pay-check ;)

After the evaluation of last year's achievements, we set out to decide this year's goals. We arrived at me reading quite a few books, doing some internal as well as external presentations, delivering some projects and participating on a couple of courses. All these goals were formalized with concrete objectives, and will be easy to measure throughout the year.

Now the final and (to this blog atleast) most interesting goal was to increase the readership of this blog. Quadruple it, to be exact. The indicator we are using is visits per week, as measured by Google Analytics. Based on statistics since August last year, my weekly visit count has been averaging on 30. By the end of the year this should have increased to 200! (for some reason we thought the weekly visit count was 50)

I have written about how to use the blog for online research before, and even if I'm not doing research anymore, the same rules still apply. Here's how I intend to increase my readership:

Blog about stuff that people want to read
I've blogged on various themes the last years like CMS, Portals, Blogging, Java, Knowledge Management and other stuff (will get better at using tags, promise). The subject of open-source content management systems seems to be the subject that attracts the largest crowd of readers, so I'll keep writing about that. As my work seems to have gone back into that direction in my newest project, it will be easier to collect experiences on the field again.

Produce trackbacks
Read blogs, leave comments. My main problem here is that my CMS blogroll swells with new posts faster than a Gartner hype gives your manager twitches in his forehead. So I'm gonna have to streamline it a bit and focus more on those blogs rather than reading all the Java-related ones.

Blog regularly
Every sunday, I tell you!

So go ahead and hit that subscribe-button now! It might result in me getting a (bigger) raise next year :)

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